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How to increase traffic to your Amazon listings

This is a guest post written by Dave Barry, which outlines a number of ways you can get more traffic to your listings on Amazon. Dave is an Amazon Seller and also a co-founder of AMZEurope.com. AMZ Europe specializes in listing optimization for Amazon UK & US and Amazon EU (Germany, France, Italy & Spain).

INTRODUCTION

Poorly performing products on Amazon arise due to:

  1. A lack of traffic – not enough people are clicking on your listing; and / or
  2. Low conversion – not enough visitors are buying your product.

In this post, we’ll focus on issue #1.

A lot of effort goes into listing a product on Amazon, including product research, negotiating with suppliers, logistics, photography, keyword research and copywriting. As such, when your product is not being seen by enough potential customers, it can be enormously frustrating.

Does your product have low or declining traffic?

To answer this, you need to determine the number of people that are visiting your listing.

You can find the number of views a particular listing is receiving in seller central:

  • Under the “Reports” menu, click, “Business Reports”
  • On the left side of this page, under subheading “By ASIN”, click on “Detail Page Sales and Traffic”
    • You will then be presented with a table of data for each of your ASINs
    • Find the relevant ASIN (you may need to scroll down) – column “Page View” will display the traffic or number of views your product listing has received
    • In the top right of the screen, you can adjust the period for which you want to see the data

If it’s a product that you have been selling for a while, check the traffic over the past 6-12 months.

A significant drop off in traffic or a steady decline indicates a problem and your focus should be on addressing this, using the tactics we’ll discuss in this article.

However, beware of the seasonality of some products when performing your analysis. Seasonal products are in higher demand at a certain time of the year and thus, will receive more traffic during this period.

For example, if you’re selling board shorts, you can expect a reduction in traffic in the months following the summer. You can check the seasonality of a product by inserting its main keyword into Google Trends.

Launched a new product that’s getting very little traffic?

This is common at the start and likely due to limited sales history and low number of product reviews (people tend to buy products that have a larger number of positive reviews) relative to your competition. Follow the tips in this post to increase the number of visitors to your new product.

Is your listing being suppressed by Amazon?

Before we discuss the methods that will help increase the traffic to your listings on Amazon, we must quickly check if your listing is being suppressed

What does this mean?

In simple terms, it refers to when Amazon lowers the ranking / limits the visibility of your listing – leading to a reduction in traffic and sales. It arises when some part(s) of your listing is not compliant with Amazon’s rules.

Is my listing being suppressed?

Here’s how to check in seller central.

Under the “Inventory” menu, click, “Manage Inventory”:

  • If you have suppressed listings, you will see “Suppressed” in the top navigation pane
    • To solve this and restore your listings to normality, you’ll usually need to provide some additional information or make an adjustment to your listing e.g. reduce the number of characters to your title.
  • If you do not have any suppressed listings, you will not see the “Suppressed” option in your navigation pane.

Here is a more detailed overview of listing suppression from Amazon – https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=200898450

BOOSTING YOUR TRAFFIC

1 – Improve Your Main Image

When a customer searches for a product like yours on Amazon, what is one of the first things they see?

Your main image.

To get more clicks and increase your traffic, you’ll need to have a top quality main image that stands out amongst your competitors.

Amazon has specific rules for your main image, which you should abide by to avoid potential suppression of your listing. In summary, your main image should be on a pure white background and your product should fill 85% or more of the image – while these are rules, following them will also better showcase your product.

Here are some other ways to improve your main image:

  • Hire a professional product photographer – in a competitive niche, this can help you get more clicks
  • Ensure it is high resolution – 1,000 px minimum in height or width
  • Present your product at a different angle than your competitors
  • Feature any extras or bonuses provided with your offering e.g. a carry bag or user guide
  • If you have high quality packaging, include this in your main image

Torn between two potential main images? Perform a split test to confirm which one will generate more traffic.

Split Testing (also referred to as “A/B Testing”) is done to find out what works best in your listings, and will ultimately generate more profit over the long term. In simple terms, it involves deriving two options / variants (main images in this case) and determining which one provides better results.

Use option 1 as your main image for 7 days. Then, change to option 2 for the following 7 days.

You can then compare the traffic and performance of your listing with these 2 main images. The image which provides more traffic and sales is the one to use for your listing going forward.

The 2 week time period above is used as a guideline – you can do longer if you wish, although I would not recommend a shorter test period. The more data and clicks you compile, the more confident you can be in the results provided.

Software like CashCowPro and Splitly can help you automate the split testing processing.

2 – Evaluate Your Pricing Strategy

Pricing is another key variable in determining whether a potential customer clicks on your listing or those of your competitors.

Finding the sweet spot can be difficult. Price too high and you’ll prevent customers from clicking on your listing. Even pricing too low can reduce traffic, as it may suggest you’re selling a low quality product and turn off some buyers.

However, if you’re not getting enough traffic, here is my advice on pricing.

To start, review the pricing of the top sellers in your niche – it’s fair to assume they have tested and determined an optimal price that attracts customers and sales.

Go to Amazon and check the price range of the top 3 to 5 sellers in your niche.

If you’re significantly above this range, you might well be pricing your offering too high.

If your product is new (with very few reviews) or in decline, an effective way of getting more clicks is to lower your sales price. This should increase traffic and sales, and in turn improve your ranking on Amazon.

Once you have restored your listing to a healthy level of traffic and sales, you can then consider a price increase.

Be careful not to price too low. I made this mistake on a listing myself. Traffic and sales on one of my products were in decline, so I wanted to offer a larger discount to customers to regain my ranking and sales.

I lowered my sales price to $8.99. However, this actually had a negative effect on conversion and sales!

My product had become an add-on item on Amazon. If your product is listed as an add-on item, it can only be purchased by customers that check out with a shopping cart of $25 or more.

Lowering your price is definitely a tactic that works to grow traffic.

However, it’s important to note that competing on price may work temporarily, but there’s nothing to stop a competitor pricing lower than you. Downward price pressure like this erodes your profit margin.

To avoid this, ensure your product offers some unique value / features compared to your competitors. This will help you succeed amongst the sprawling forest of generic private label products being sold on Amazon.

3 – Run A Lightning Deal

What is a lightning deal?

It is a promotional offering, where you provide a special discount for your product and Amazon features it on its Deals page for several hours.

This is almost guaranteed to provide a large influx of traffic and along with it, sales!

It’s an excellent way to revive a slow moving product listing.

However, not all products are eligible for lighting deals.

To check if your product(s) are eligible, go to seller central. Under “Inventory”, click “Lightning Deals”. The lightning deals that you can opt to run (if any) will be listed under “Recommendations” at the bottom of the page.

If the product you are seeking to boost is not eligible for a lightning deal, check back a week later as this page is updated on a weekly basis.

4 – Find New Keywords

The keywords included in your listing have a major impact on the traffic your listings receive.

Your product will not appear in Amazon’s search results if a customer uses a keyword that is not in your listing or search terms (also known as “back-end keywords”).

As such, by failing to include just one high-volume keyword that’s relevant to your product, you’ll be missing out on a significant amount of traffic.

To ensure all important keywords are identified and included in our listing, we must perform comprehensive keyword research.

With Amazon recently reducing search terms to a maximum of 250 characters, it’s more important than ever to identify and target the right keywords.

Tips when doing keyword research:

  • Experience with keyword research is preferable, including familiarity with tools and software that can provide data and automation to enhance the process;
  • Keyword research should be done by someone with (a) comprehensive vocabulary and (b) understanding of your product / niche, to ensure all important keywords (high volume and relevant) are identified; and
  • Understand the difference between keyword research for Google and Amazon. People search on Google for information, services and products, while searches on Amazon are just for products – prioritize keywords that have buyer intent, over more informational keyword phrases.

In summary, investing time in keyword research is essential as it has a major impact on the quantity and quality of traffic directed to your listing.


Don’t have the time or knowledge to perform comprehensive keyword research?

Hire us! Our listing optimization services features detailed keyword research, along with copywriting for Amazon US & UK, and localization (a mix of copywriting and translation) for Amazon EU (Germany, France, Italy & Spain).


As part of our listing optimization services, we also optimize your product title to get more clicks / traffic, which we’ll cover next.

5 – Optimize Your Product Title

Along with your main image and pricing, your product’s title is the other key variable displayed in search.

These 3 factors provide the first impression of your product to customers. The better they are, relative to your competition, the more traffic you’ll get.

We have covered main image and pricing already, so now let’s talk about improving your product title.

The first goal of an Amazon Product Title is to capture the attention of buyers. We do this by placing the most important keywords at the start of your title. If buyers don’t see keywords relevant to their needs, they likely won’t click on your product. This is also important because mobile devices (smartphones and tablets) display fewer characters of your title – almost 60% of Amazon customers report that their primary way to purchase products on Amazon is on their smartphone or tablet.  

Titles must be written in a compelling way too, encouraging customers to click on your product, instead of your competitors’ offerings.

It’s important to note that product titles in most categories are limited to 200 characters (including spaces). To maximize space and feature as many important keywords as possible, your title should not comprise grammatically perfect / full sentences – it should be a mix of keywords and copywriting.

For example, let’s assume we are selling a wallet made from high quality leather. In a full sentence, we would write, “the product is made from premium leather”. For an Amazon Title, the phrase “Premium Leather” is better – we don’t waste too many characters, but emphasize the important feature we want to.

You can derive a new title for your product using these tips.

However, it’s important to verify that it actually improves the performance of your listing.

Run a split test to check if the new title gets more clicks than your original title.

Next up, we’ll talk about advertising. While this is a paid method to increase your traffic, it is certainly an effective one.

6 – Advertise on Amazon

There are 2 ways to advertise your products on Amazon:

Sponsored Products for promoting / advertising individual listings.

Headline Search Ads – available to brand registered owners, with 3 or more product listings.

Low traffic and not advertising your listings on Amazon?

Get started with sponsored products. It’s easy to do and will drive traffic to your listing. Amazon offers a $50 credit to those starting out oo.

If you are advertising on Amazon, but still have low traffic, there are a few things you can do to get more traffic from advertising:

  • Increase your bids on keywords – this will improve your ad placement and help you get more clicks
  • Increase your daily budget – this will increase the number of clicks you can get from advertising in a particular day. Do this if you are regularly spending / reaching your daily budget / limit set on Amazon.
  • Perform keyword research to identify new keywords to target in your advertising campaigns

BONUS TRAFFIC TIPS FOR AMAZON EUROPE

For those selling on Amazon Europe (UK, Germany, France, Italy and Spain), here are some other ways to increase your traffic.

A – Enable FBA Export

FBA Export allows sellers to choose which European countries their products can be shipped to.

If your listing’s export settings in Seller Central (pictured below) is set to “Disabled” or “9 Countries”, you are missing out on traffic from many countries in Europe.

Update to “26 countries” and open up your listing to traffic and sales from a number of other European countries. Note that sellers are not charged additional fees for FBA Export orders – as you can see below, there are “no additional fees for FBA Export orders on Amazon”.

 

B – Keyword Research & Amazon Europe

If English is your first language and you’re selling on non-English speaking marketplaces (Germany, France, Italy & Spain), make sure your keyword research is done by a native speaker.

A comprehensive vocabulary is key to ensure the best keywords for your listing are found, and included in your title and search terms – both key to generating traffic.

Also, a native speaker will also ensure that only keywords relevant to your product are included in your listing and search terms – non-relevant keywords will lead to traffic from customers not specifically searching for a product like yours, and likely hurt your conversion rate. Also, targeting non-relevant keywords is technically forbidden by Amazon.

You may be tempted to save money and just translate your English keywords. But this is not recommended. Without doing the “research” part, you will fail to identify keywords and limit the potential traffic to your listing. Furthermore, direct translation of keyword phrases (two or more words) from English into another language will often produce a phrase that has a totally different meaning than intended.

C – Product Titles for Amazon Europe

As we learned in section 5 above,a good Amazon Product Title captures the attention of buyers by including the right keywords and being written in an appealing way.

The best way to ensure this for the non-English speaking marketplaces (Amazon Germany, France, Italy and Spain) is to hire a native speaker to write and optimize your listings for Amazon EU.

A poorly written or translated title (like the example below) will reduce your credibility in the eyes of your potential customers and is certain to hurt your traffic and sales.

FINAL THOUGHTS

I hope you liked this post and use the tips provided to increase your traffic on Amazon!

If you’re looking for help with new listings or to boost your current listings, check out our listing optimization offerings for Amazon US / UK and Amazon EU (Germany, France, Italy & Spain). Designed to increase your traffic and sales on Amazon!

We have also created a listing optimization blueprint – it’s a checklist you can work through to improve your listings. It’s based on what we’ve learned from optimizing hundreds of listings to date and I’m sure it will provide you with a few helpful tips – download it for free here! www.amzeurope.com/amazon-listing-optimization-checklist

Before signing off, I’d like to say a special thanks Manuel. There is a lot of excellent content on his website, and it’s a real pleasure to have my post featured here.

If you have any questions for me, you can get in touch directly through AMZEurope.com or comment below. Please share this post if you like it too!

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Why you ALWAYS need inspections in China and Europe trip report

A little more than 2 weeks ago I came back from my Europe “vacation” which was not really a vacation but more work because I was constantly on some calls or working on other stuff.

It was quiet around me but I was not sleeping but rather working on many projects. Some of them I wanted to share today. Before that I also wanted to share some moments of my 7800 kilometer trip (4800 miles) in Europe before I start with today’s blog post which is about factory inspections in China. 

What else can you expect in this blog post? 

  1. I launched a new product (the best day & dry pack 2018) 🙂
  2. I ordered more products to ramp up my second brand Mandarin-Gear
  3. I launched a new case study on brand building and social media (all for free)

But more on that later. So without further ado, here are some impressions from my Europe trip:

Before I left to Europe I spoke to Thai Amazon sellers about Brand Building. Fun!

We left to Europe on 29th of July. Most people who know from my previous posts about my fear of flying. Also explained here. So I treated myself to lying flat again.

We landed in Vienna (Austria) pretty late that night and had a long breakfast the next morning with an amazing view

Perfect setting for a Sunday morning.

We then headed to my Mum’s place near Salzburg and would you know there was a village festival. Which was pretty empty for what it was ?

Stayed for a few days there and then headed for a hike in the Tyrolean mountains near my friends place. I took the opportunity to snap a few pictures with my newest product that I launched 2 weeks ago. 

Pretty proud of this item and I even use it myself (or ask my wife to stand in for photos) ?

We then made our way to Sweden and stopped in Hamburg in between to meet up with Gil from Privatelabeljourney.de and his lovely wife.

We finally arrived after a 16 hour drive to my private sanctuary. Had to chill for a few minutes to let it all sink in.

On the very next day we went looking for mushrooms in the forest.

There you go ?

Enjoying a sunset.

And we are off fishing!

I M ON A BOAT

Preparing for my speech in Innsbruck (Austria) 2 weeks from now.

In between goofing around and relaxing.

Or eating Swedish food.

Our first catch!

And more mushrooms!

…and mushrooms….

 

On the last few days we had friends from Thailand visiting

A few days later we were in Venice, Italy. Another 18 hour drive.

Venice

Venice

From there we headed to Budapest, Hungary (another 8 hour drive) for one of my best friends wedding.

Including a bachelor night. No details here ?

Meeting friends from Hong Kong in Budapest

The wedding was set in a beautiful castle outside of Budapest.

And there’s the freshly married couple

We went to lake Balaton (Europe’s largest fresh water lake) and Vienna for a few days after that.

Eventually bringing me to the last leg of my trip. I was speaking to becoming and existing Amazon sellers about niche selection and why innovation in product development matters.

Amazing crowd and excellent event!

And Vienna again on the last night before flying home.

 

So that was that, my 6 weeks in Europe. A lot more moments that I wanted to share but I don’t want to bore you and get into today’s topic:

why you ALWAYS need inspections in China.

So when I got home to Asia I had an inspection on my 7th re-order of the French Press case study product I did a year ago. 

I’ve always preached how important inspections are and I do them every time. Even with suppliers I work with for a long time.

It really doesn’t matter how well you know your supplier and how often they plead not to do inspections. You hear something along this line: “don’t worry my friend – always good quality, no need to inspect”. Have you heard that phrase? I’ve heard it a million times and I ALWAYS do inspections anyway.

So this was an inspection with my “famous” French Press and before I received the report the supplier told me many times that we don’t need an inspection… Even on the day before I received the report the supplier messaged me (because he was obviously in the factory during the inspection) that I should release the shipment, there are just a few scratches, nothing to worry about and I should go ahead and send him the payment….

Never trust your supplier. I am not talking about the sales representative of the factory. I am talking about the factory workers, the QA manager on duty and down the hierarchy. They might have a bad day or the factory manager decides to rush an order (remember many factories are being closed right now so I attribute these issues to that).

Have an inspection, evaluate the problems and release shipments if these are minor mistakes. I often release shipments even if the inspection is “fail” when there are minor issues. However in critical cases, demand re-work & re-inspections until its fixed. Otherwise the supplier doesn’t see his money. Another good point to never pay more than 30% downpayment.

To see what I mean when I say critical issues here are some images from the inspection:

Always view inspections from a customers point of view. Would you accept these type of issues? 

The supplier just switched screws that were cheaper without my approval!

And there were many other issues. So what do you do in these kind of situations? First of all you need to have an agreement in place when you place the order. I usually have three terms that I include in my contract and 95% of suppliers will agree to that:

  1. Re-inspection and re-work at suppliers cost if the inspection has major and critical issues
  2. Replace returned units from customers higher than 6-8% (depends on product). This usually means those 6-8% are free units on my next order.
  3. Penalty fees for late delivery. Say 10 days after agreed delivery date 0.5% of total order value. 15 days – 0.75% and so on.

Most suppliers will agree to these terms. The point is you negotiate this when you place the order and before you transfer any money. These things happen can happen to all of us and you always need to have a safety net (inspection).

So what happened in my case? The supplier asked me if it would be ok to send pictures only without a re-inspection… no way. How would I know if he just takes photos of items that were in perfect condition anyway and not re-work?

So I asked them to acknowledge our agreement of paying for re-work and re-inspection in case of serious issues. And that’s what happened. The supplier has since re-worked everything and the re-inspection was a few days ago, this time with very minor issues and I released the shipment.

The moral of the story here is really to have a safety net and don’t let the supplier talk you into easy solutions (for him). Because your business will suffer in the end. Granted this was the first time the supplier screwed up but that just makes my point. You never know what is going on on the day of production and it might not even be your sales representative fault. HAVE INSPECTIONS they start from 100$. 

So what else happened? 

  1. I launched a new product that I developed over the last 6 months. If you’re into hiking and outdoors, feel free to check it out ?

2) I launched a new website a few weeks ago called eCommercebutlers to help people on brand building, social media and decided to do a new case study on brand building (all for free). 

I will be documenting my entire journey on growing and further building my brand with videos on where one of my brands (Mandarin-Gear) is right now and how I intend to launch all my products in the future via social media and email lists only. 

My goal is to show that it is inexpensive to build a brand but it can be done (while I admit it takes time). 

The entire case study is free to watch so please head over to below link and sign up for updates if you are interested in watching my progress:

https://www.ecommercebutlers.com/brand-building-case-study/

Ps.: We also have a FREE Product Launch Checklist for you when signing up to our newsletter. 

I’ll also have a group where I’ll share updates and where we can discuss strategies over here: 

https://web.facebook.com/groups/124707288184753/

I aim to release a new video every week to show my progress.

I’d be happy to have you join me on this journey ?

That’s it for today, long overdue and long blog post. Thanks for reading and if you enjoyed it, please share ?

All the best,

Manuel

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What’s new on ImportDojo?

Hey guys,

It’s been a few weeks since my last post and this is due to a holiday I took in Europe. Currently I am sitting in Budapest, Hungary writing this up. It’ll be another week until I am back in Hong Kong but I thought I’d give you a brief update on what I was up to.

Ecommercebutlers

I’ve launched a new page a few weeks ago called eCommercebutlers.com

The goal of this site is to help people build brands online. We’ll be regularly posting free content to help you build your eCommerce brand.

I’ve also moved the Sourcing Operation of ImportDojo to this site. So if you need help sourcing from professionals please check it out. As many of you know I’ve had a sourcing operation for quite a while now in Hong Kong which helps people find manufactures in China as well as handle the whole order follow up with factories for many eCommerce sellers.

Junglescout Million Dollar Case Study

Last week I was in a webinar with Greg Mercer & Kym from Junglescout to help with their Million Dollar Case Study. Currently they are in a supplier outreach phase and asked me for help and giving directions when sourcing in China. It was a little over an hour and we had a great chat.  If you are curios how I choose suppliers and what background checks I do before placing an order you can check out the whole webinar here:

The Million Dollar Case Study: Europe – Session #4: Find A Manufacturer In China

 

This also made me think of a few things in terms of supplier communications so I wanted to write up a few more notes and this brings me to today’s blog post:

Why Chinese suppliers never (or only partly) answer questions I asked? 

I’d like to give you a bit of an overview why Chinese suppliers don’t or might not reply to questions. 

1) Unprofessional inquiry

Since I am also a supplier based in Hong Kong I get inquiries from overseas clients on my products sometimes. You wouldn’t believe the level of un-professionalism I get sometimes.

Here’s an email from a inquriy I received a couple months back:

“Hi,

Please quote your products.

thank you”

And thats it. There is no name, no introduction, no details to which products are to be quoted, no quantity no final market etc. 

I usually delete these emails right away simply because I feel the buyer isn’t serious enough to buy from me. If he is, he would put in more time to send me a professional introduction what he does, what he intends to buy from me, what certification he might need, the market he is selling to and other details. Just as I, no supplier will take you serious with this kind of inquiry. 

Here’s how an email could look like:

Hi …,

My name is ….. and I am the ….(Manager/President/Buyer etc.) of …. Limited/Inc.

We are a (fill in your company’s business, e.g., Importer/Buying Office/Whole seller/Online shop) and are operating in (fill in your

country). You can also check out our website under: www. …..

I am writing to you today to inquire about the product I saw on your website/catalogue/exhibition.

The model number is….

Could you please give me the following information: (You can fill in the details in the attached quotation format or send me your quotation in the first step.)

Unit price based on …. Pieces

Minimum Order Quantity

Available certification (CE, RoHS, FCC, GS, etc.)

Production lead time

Available colors

Payment terms

I would then evaluate and get back to you as soon as possible.

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Thanks and best regards,

 In 95% of all cases you should get a more serious reply from a supplier. 

2) Unstructured inquiry

Some buyers don’t structure their initial inquiry well. Or they put important questions at the end of an email which can be easily overseen.

As an example looking at above email inquiry:

….Payment terms

I would then evaluate and get back to you as soon as possible.

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Thanks and best regards,

Oh, also we need to know what is the colors you can provide? 

The last sentence can be easily missed. So make sure that your inquiry has either bullet points, numbered paragraphs or other forms of structure. 

If you want you can also make important points BOLD. 

3) Too much work from other customers – ask again and again until you receive answers. 

Sometimes suppliers are simply overworked. I’m sure you’ve seen it, they even reply emails and work on Saturdays and Sundays. 

Usually 1 sales representative had 20 or more customers that he he/she needs to handle at the same time. And just like in any business they prioritize bigger customers first. 

Keep in mind that “we” Amazon/eCommerce sellers are mostly small fish if we order 500 or 1,000 units. Most retailers or wholesalers order 5,000 units upwards. 

You can imagine who gets priority. So suppliers tend to pay less attention to us smaller buyers and generally oversee some parts of your questions. 

4) Low potential client

supplier doesnt really care if you place an order and will treat your business with little seriousness. 

5) Supplier simply isn’t interested in your business – walk away

Chinese are very afraid of loosing face. So instead of telling you that they aren’t interested in your business they treat you with very little priority. 

Sometimes they don’t need any additional business at all. Maybe because they have too many clients or as previously mentioned don’t see your potential as compared to the workload.

Imagine you are a supplier and you have several clients who place orders every month more than 50,000USD. Easy work, setup processes with the existing clients and not much work. Then you have a client who has x amount of modifications, high standards and very little purchase order quantity. 

One could argue that you could become such a client if the supplier puts more effort in your first orders and your orders will grow in time. However these days factories have a lot of pressure filling production. Rising raw material prices, labour costs and expensive machinery to automate manufacturing. So obvioulsy you’ll go for clients who are easy, place larger orders, make you more profits and can fill your production capacity. 

Generally there’s to say that many new Amazon sellers have the impression that the factories are waiting for their orders and welcome every client with open arms. That is not the case. 

In our business to stay ahead of the competition you need to be unique, set yourself apart from the competition and most likely you don’t want to risk too much capital with new products. 

That also means that on top of our high requirements towards factories we don’t give them “big” business in the beginning. 

Key to a great supplier realtionship is to communicate your needs in the beginning and weed out those suppliers who aren’t really interested in your business or only reply half of your questions.

Imagine how difficult it will be down the road if you are having problems before even placing an order. Move on to the next supplier. 

Having said all that, there are great suppliers out there and even if I sometimes don’t get all my questions answered I can generally say most suppliers are willing to cooperate on many levels and ARE interested in my business. 

Don’t try to squeeze out every cent in your negotiation because what is it worth if you get a cheap price but poor quality and a supplier who’ll dissapear if you have problems. 

Treat your suppliers with respect – I’ve had great success with my strategy when building relationships with my suppliers. Live and let live. 

That’s it for today. Let me know if you have any questions. Simply comment below 

All the best and happy sourcing,

Manuel